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BE AHEAD OF THE CURVE

imageThe joy that comes with writing is quite indescribable… but when you have to prove yourself to a  wide range of audience and top executives, you’ll understand that it takes a lot to write. People value depth, perfection and  great standards.

Nevertheless, Writers are gods! They do not only feed your imaginations; they create both fantasies and reality around you. I love the power behind the sword of writers, and today I will be sharing what is titled: QUICK LITTLE AMATEUR SCREENWRITING TIPRANT (TM) by Geoff LaTulippe.

Do have an interesting read.

FACTORS TO CONSIDER WHEN PITCHING A SCRIPT

  1. When you’re pitching a script to someone, you’re pitching yourself too, like it or not. Because you’re building a business relationship. So, when you’re asking someone to read your script, you’re asking someone to open the door to being a creative partner with you on it.

  2. You have to be interactive. Never forget this part of the equation. It’s infinitely important, because someone saying “Yes, I’ll take a look,” is also saying, “Yes, I feel I could deal with you.” Which means that, on the flip side, someone can be saying, “This might be a great script but the prospect of dealing with you is nauseating.”

  3. First impressions are beyond important, especially to those who are consistently busy, because they have to make value judgement for time.

So, when you’re pitching your script as a project, you’re also pitching yourself. Be someone worth working with.”

THE WRONG WAY TO PITCH A SCRIPT (THINGS TO AVOID)

According to Geoff LaTulippe, it takes courage to ask someone to look at your note, whether it’s for notes or for sale or in between.

When pitching a script, avoid statements or notes like :
*The concept is COMPLETELY ORIGINAL
*The film would GROSS BILLIONS
*It’s characters are PEOPLE WE’VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE.
*It is guaranteed to need budget of $300 million or more.

Don’t ever pitch your script this way. Ever. You’ll look like an a$$hole who has no idea how the film industry works and will out yourself in mere seconds as a disconnected neophyte.

The key here is: You want to project how much you love your script, and how much it meant to write it. So pitch your script IN TERMS OF YOU as much as you do in terms of a concept, a logline, and a little bit of information.

” I ( and I’m not alone) get excited when a writer tells me how excited they are for their scripts -because it means something to them. Not because it’s the most original thing ever written. Not because they think it’ll break the records. But because they care.
And if you care about a script, it represents your best possible stab at writing every single time. 24/7/356.”

FINALLY, HOW TO STRUCTURE AND PITCH YOUR SCRIPT
The next time you have a chance to submit your script to someone, structure it like this:

  1. Here’s my concept, here’s a logline, here are some films it connects with on a tonal level. If there was any inspiration, sure. Be brief.
  2. Here’s my drive for writing this script: a place, a person, an experience. Why I care about this like I do. Again, brevity is your friend.
  3. Thank you for the opportunity. (Stop here. NO ” totally original “, no “never before seen characters “, no budgets. Just thank and go.)

I promise you, hit them with a great logline, express your passion and excitement rather than your misguided conceit and you’re set up.
Then, the only thing left to hang your hat on is your writing. Which is what you ultimately want anyway.

I talk a lot about avoiding reasons for people to tell you NO. This is one of the biggest: Come off as someone they’ll want to work with. You do that, and you’ll have won 50%of the battle that your writing has no impact on. You’ll be ahead of the curve.
Shoot yourself in the foot and that door may never open again. People have time to fix scripts. They have no interest in fixing people.”

Thanks for reading.

Geoff LaTulippe is an American screenwriter and film director, best known as the writer of the 2010 film “Going the distance.” You can follow him on Twitter -@DrGMLaTulippe and ask him screenwriting /industry questions. #StayInformed

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